The Relaxation Protocol

When I first read about Dr. Karen Overall’s Protocol for Relaxation in Leslie McDevitt’s book “Control Unleashed,” I had NO idea what it was about. None. Never heard of it. It’s considered baseline work for serious behavior modification training, like what I’m doing with Lilly. That much I got from the book, but it wasn’t until I saw the whole thing in print that a sinking feeling sunk me. I’m feeling better about it now, but here’s a bit about my journey so far.

The protocol, as I understand it, comes from a big clinical behavior book designed for PhD type behaviorists and veterinarians. That’s intimidating enough, even though I often interview board-certified veterinary specialists and other smarty-pants experts from various fields for the magazine articles I write.

The book is somewhat expensive, and it’s hard to find at your usual public library, so I went searching online for details about the protocol. It’s a very regimented thing, so without those details, it’s impossible to do. Thankfully, Leslie posted a 12-page fileĀ  of the protocol as part of her Control Unleashed Yahoo Group.

I’m really boiling things down here, but essentially the protocol teaches a dog to settle and defer to you in no matter what happens. And, while the instructions say SIT while this happens, while that happens, the goal is to get the dog to relax, lay down, whatever, rather than sitting at crazy, training attention.

For example, if Lilly thinks she’s going to learn something new or “train” in a formal sense, she gets very, very excited (at least at home). Generally speaking, a learning Lilly is NOT a relaxed Lilly. That’s one characterization I’m hoping to change since Lilly stresses out when that learning is made more difficult by being somewhere or near something that makes her nervous. As we’ve discussed before, she either shuts down or gets reactive toward (mostly) other dogs.

In the protocol, the dog can shift positions some, just not get up and wander around or misbehave. And, she gets rewarded after each little thing. You don’t ask her to get up and sit again, or lay down again, you just reward her for staying put while you do various things.

It’s very easy (and I’m guilty too) to look at this and think it’s just an obedience thing … like it’s a really, really reliable or really long stay, but it’s not. However, my first thought was, “That’s a LOT of sitting.” And, that’s all it is.

Well, if I’m being honest, I’ll also add that I thought it would not work. It made no sense to me. Intuitively, it just felt weird. And, even my trainer said she’d never tried it nor did she know anyone who had. In a way, she challenged me to be the first to really give it a spin and report back. (Now that I’m nearly done with round one, we both wonder how many people stick with it.)

So, in order to take on a training protocol that requires daily effort for 15 days in one location, then 15 days in another, then 15 days in another, etc., I had to suspend my disbelief. I had to tell my inner critic, my inner skeptic to shut the heck up. I had to believe that Dr. Overall in all her wisdom had a scientific basis for this protocol. I had to believe (or at least pretend to believe) that the pace and repetition and structure of the exercises had some quantifiable effect on a dog’s brain.

But, here’s the problem: on the page, the protocol is visually overwhelming. The list of exercises swam in front of my eyes as I tried to keep my focus on Lilly so that I could reward her at the right times. Since my own brain could not hold more than a couple of instructions at a time, I kept consulting the page, losing my place, and breaking my connection with Lilly. Not good.

So, I had an idea … what if I recorded each day’s protocol so that I could listen to it on my iPod while I worked with Lilly? I asked around, and others who are working hard on the protocol liked the idea, so I did it. And, it’s helping a TON with its timed exercises and quiet gaps for things that require leaving the room, etc.

I’m not naturally an auditory learner, but I can be very task oriented when things come at a pace my brain can process. Plus, I tend to be more self-contained and calm when I’m wearing ear buds and using the iPod. I often wear it while running errands to block out noise and other people’s stress energy. So, I figured it would help in Lilly training too. And, it has.

I uploaded the MP3 files I made to Leslie’s Yahoo group, but for those who do not have access to that file storage online, I’m putting them here too. Each one is about 5-10 minutes.

Relaxation Protocol Audio Files

Simply right-click on each one and select Save Link As in order to save the MP3 audio file onto your computer. Then, move them … however you do that for your iPod or MP3 unit.

Relaxation Protocol Day1

Relaxation Protocol Day2

Relaxation Protocol Day3

Relaxation Protocol Day4

Relaxation Protocol Day5

Relaxation Protocol Day6

Relaxation Protocol Day7

Relaxation Protocol Day8

Relaxation Protocol Day9

Relaxation Protocol Day10

Relaxation Protocol Day11

Relaxation Protocol Day12

Relaxation Protocol Day13

Relaxation Protocol Day14

Relaxation Protocol Day15

What’s interesting to me is that while recording these instructions I kind of zonked out. My brain went very still. Granted, I recorded several back to back, but that is, I believe, what’s supposed to happen to the dogs too, so I’m glad I had that experience. However, it may also mean that I missed a thing or two (or repeated something). If so, I’m sorry in advance if the recordings are not perfect.

I’ll conclude today with a few tips that have really helped Lilly understand the difference between protocol work and other kinds of task training:

  • Spray that DAP (dog appeasing pheromone) on your dog’s relaxation mat. Honestly, I don’t know if it helps, but it can’t hurt, especially if your dog already knows the scent.
  • Don’t use a clicker, if it excited your dog. Instead use your marker word or a generic praise word.
  • Use a different tone of voice than you might for other “command” type work. I, for example, speak much more softly and lower in tone.
  • Pay attention to your body posture. Rather than the “show me something,” frontal body and smiling face I use for shaping or games, I tip my head and turn my body a little, with my hands behind my back.
  • Take deep breaths. Two days of protocol and breathing got Lilly to lay down from a sit without me asking.
  • Shape calm traits (sleepy eyes, relaxed ears, head down) separately, then incorporate them into the protocol.

It will be many more weeks before I can report on Lilly’s full response to the protocol, so stay tuned.

For now, I’ll simply say that if you asked me on day 5, I would
have said it was working. But if you asked me on day 13, I would have said it wasn’t.

10 thoughts on “The Relaxation Protocol

  1. HelenaG
    January 3, 2013 at 8:34 am

    Hello Roxanne! Have you deleted the MP3 files for the The Relaxation Protocol or have you changed address? It comes “file not found”. I have started to look into this the last days. Seems to be a interesting way…

    Thanx!

    1. January 3, 2013 at 8:47 am

      No, Helena … I have NOT deleted or moved the files. I’ll email you the link privately as well, but here is it again. The link is ALWAYS available directly from our home page.

      Canine Relaxation Protocol

  2. Christina
    December 9, 2012 at 1:21 pm

    This is great! Thanks for posting this. We adopted a fearful dog four months ago and are at the start of our journey together. This is very helpful : )

  3. caroline
    May 8, 2012 at 10:09 am

    Thanks so much for this, i’m trying to start the RP and i was feeling quite overwhelmed after reading the protocol. Phew.
    How did it go with your dog after all ?
    Caroline

    1. May 8, 2012 at 10:46 am

      You are welcome, Caroline. It is really daunting on paper, so … even though I’m NOT an auditory learner … these recordings made much more sense to me. Lilly still has “issues,” but the relaxation protocol plays a huge role in how we manage her when she gets scared.

  4. torrant
    September 2, 2009 at 12:45 pm

    I have recently downloaded detailed description of several good technics on dogs treaining. I am going to teach my Bart using them. If you are also intersted, have a look – “train your dog” at http://rapid4me.com

  5. Rox
    October 23, 2008 at 1:32 am

    An update from Harold on Oct 22, 2008:

    I finally succeeded in getting the RP files into itunes.  After downloading
    them, I needed to double click them and that sent them to my itunes library.
     Simple, in the end.  Thanks so much for making these.

  6. Harold
    October 8, 2008 at 10:42 pm

    Hi,
    The files play on itunes but won’t sync to my ipod. The Apple Help says that files need to be 32 bit speed or higher to download to ipods and it appears that these files are 16. Do I need to do something special to enable them to be transferred?

    Harold

  7. Rox
    March 12, 2008 at 6:30 pm

    Hey, Marnie!

    You are welcome. I’m glad they are helping. I can tell by my visitors stats that A LOT of people are downloading the files to use, and that’s about the best thing I can imagine. Anything that makes the protocol (which is daunting) more doable is a good thing.

    Good luck!

  8. Marnie
    March 12, 2008 at 5:40 pm

    Hey, Roxanne,

    Thanks so much for making these files. It makes it so much easier to go through the relaxation protocol.

    They rock, Rox!

    Marnie